Category Archives: Quoted

You Cannot Perceive Spiritual Truth Until You Feelingly Experience It, And Many Truths Are Not Really Felt Except In Adversity.

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You Cannot Perceive Spiritual Truth Until You Feelingly Experience It, And Many Truths Are Not Really Felt Except In Adversity.

I Will Act Now

Never has there been a map, however carefully executed to detail and scale, which carried its owner over even one inch of ground. Never has there been a parchment of law, however fair, which prevented one crime. Never has there been a scroll, even such as the one I hold, which earned so much as a penny or produced a single word of acclamation. Action, alone, is the tinder which ignites the map, the parchment, this scroll, my dreams, my plans, my goals, into a living force. Action is the food and drink which will nourish my success. – I Will Act Now (Og Mandino)

Purpose To See

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3 things that are essential in life: something to look up to, something to look forward to, and someone to look at. Contentment is the fuel of a righteous progress. Hope is a reward for commitment, and commitment is the journey of consistency. Purpose to see, feel, hear and enjoy the despair and the beauty of your world along your way. Instruct your speech and guide your lips with kindness. Be keen to understand, quick to learn, able to remember; Be delicate to interpret and ready to speak.

— [Kabue Charles (McKabue)]

Love is the desire to do good for others

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If anything matters, then everything matters

How you do one thing, is How you do everything

Two Monks and a Woman

Source: Two Monks and a Woman – a Zen Lesson | KindSpring.org

A senior monk and a junior monk were traveling together. At one point, they came to a river with a strong current. As the monks were preparing to cross the river, they saw a very young and beautiful woman also attempting to cross. The young woman asked if they could help her cross to the other side.

The two monks glanced at one another because they had taken vows not to touch a woman.

Then, without a word, the older monk picked up the woman, carried her across the river, placed her gently on the other side, and carried on his 
journey.

The younger monk couldn’t believe what had just happened. After rejoining his companion, he was speechless, and an hour passed without a word between them.

Two more hours passed, then three, finally the younger monk could contain himself any longer, and blurted out “As monks, we are not permitted a woman, how could you then carry that woman on your shoulders?”

The older monk looked at him and replied, “Brother, I set her down on the other side of the river, why are you still carrying her?”

This simple Zen story has a beautiful message about living in the present moment. How often do we carry around past hurts, holding onto resentments when the only person we are really hurting is ourselves.

We all go through times in life when other people say things or behave in a way that is hurtful towards us. We can chose to ruminate over past actions or events, but it will ultimately weigh us down and sap our energy.

Instead we can choose to let go of what doesn’t serve us anymore and concentrate on the present moment. Until we can find a level of peace and happiness in the present circumstances of our lives, we will never be content, because ‘now’ is all we will ever have.

His Own Heart was Lecherous

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Source: His Own Heart was Lecherous | Bible.org

One of the most powerful stories I have ever heard on the nature of the human heart is told by Malcolm Muggeridge. Working as a journalist in India, he left his residence one evening to go to a nearby river for a swim. As he entered the water, across the river he saw an Indian woman from the nearby village who had come to have her bath. Muggeridge impulsively felt the allurement of the moment, and temptation stormed into his mind. He had lived with this kind of struggle for years but had somehow fought it off in honor of his commitment to his wife, Kitty. On this occasion, however, he wondered if he could cross the line of marital fidelity. He struggled just for a moment and then swam furiously toward the woman, literally trying to outdistance his conscience. His mind fed him the fantasy that stolen waters would be sweet, and he swam the harder for it. Now he was just two or three feet away from her, and as he emerged from the water, any emotion that may have gripped him paled into insignificance when compared with the devastation that shattered him as he looked at her.

“She was old and hideous…and her skin was wrinkled and, worst of all, she was a leper….This creature grinned at me, showing a toothless mask.” The experience left Muggeridge trembling and muttering under his breath, “What a dirty lecherous woman!” But then the rude shock of it dawned upon him—it was not the woman who was lecherous; it was his own heart.

Ravi Zacharias, Can Man Live Without God, (Word Publ, Dallas: 1994), pp. 136-137

Uprightness

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Do what think is right, not what you feel is right;

Say what you mean, and mean what you say;

If you start alone, be sure to finish alone;

Incline more to be nonchalant, and less meddlesome;

Be candid, reflective, conscious, and visionary;

Hope for the best, but expect the worst;

Remember, to be is to be perceived;

Love yourself, be unselfish, and promote cohesiveness;

The Greatest Loss in Life…

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Death is not the greatest loss in life. The greatest loss is when life dies inside you while you live…

The fool did not know it was impossible so he did it…

Listening Is Loving